Testing

COVID-19 Testing in Los Angeles County

If you are experiencing the following symptoms, we urge you to get a COVID-19 test:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Chills
  • Repeated shaking with chills
  • Muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Testing Sites Near Westlake Village

All residents who want a test should first call their Primary Care Provider or Healthcare Center to get a test at their facility. 

Nearby Testing Sites in LA County

CVS – Winnetka
19701 Vanowen St., Winnetka, CA 91306

West Valley – Warner Center
6097 Canoga Ave., Woodland Hills, CA 91367

Nearby Testing Sites in Ventura County

Conejo Valley Family Medical Group
125 W. Thousand Oaks Blvd., Suite 200

Conejo Creek Parks South
1300 East Janss Road

What L.A. County Residents and Employers Need to Know About COVID-19 Testing Now

New County Testing Sites Opening Soon to Meet Demand, But Health Officials Seek Support from the Public to Prioritize Tests For Those At Highest Risk 

As cases and hospitalizations rise, many residents believe they need to get tested for COVID-19. However, Los Angeles County health officials stress that not everyone needs to be tested and emphasize the basic ways individuals and businesses can and should protect themselves from this virus.

Here are 10 tips to keep in mind as we navigate this dynamic situation together:

  1. At this point in this rapidly-evolving crisis, it is important to reserve testing for those who have a medical or public health reason for it. While Los Angeles County currently has enough testing supplies to meet the needs of those who need to be tested, the number of COVID-19 cases are on the rise here and throughout the country. Let’s work together to reserve testing for those with a medical or public health need.
  2. The common-sense rules still apply. Here are the most important things we as individuals and community members can do to slow the spread of COVID-19.
    • Stay home as much as possible. 
    • Leave home only for essential activities like work, medical appointments and grocery shopping. 
    • Wear a cloth face covering when you’re out in public. 
    • Stay at least six feet apart from people you don’t live with. 
    • Wash your hands thoroughly and often, and don’t touch your face. 
  3. Check with a health care provider if you think you need to get tested. It’s always best to work with your health care professional to determine the kind of care you need—just as you would with any other health care concern. Unless you have specific symptoms, exposures or risk factors, you may not need to be tested, and your health care provider can talk with you about your concerns and help determine if you need to be tested. If you don’t have a doctor, call 211 to get a referral.
  4. Know your risk level. According to the latest Public Health guidance, highest priority for testing should go to people with symptomsincluding hospitalized patients, healthcare workers, first responders, employees and residents in group living settings, and people over 65 years old or with underlying health conditionsthat place them at higher risk of serious complications. Asymptomatic people— those without symptoms—also should be prioritized for testing if they are part of a public health investigation, if they live or work in high risk settings, such as skilled nursing facilities or homeless shelters, if they are a close contact of someone with a confirmed positive diagnosis of COVID-19, or if they are an essential worker.

Prioritization of routine testing among other asymptomatic people is not recommended at this time. People over the age of 65 or with underlying conditions do not necessarily need to be tested unless they have symptoms, have had an exposure or have been told by public health to be tested. Once again, please check with your healthcare provider about your specific situation and let their medical advice guide you.

  1. Employers should not require a negative COVID-19 test result before employees return to work, and employees do not need to present a certificate saying they have tested negative, under the current guidance from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health.
  2. Employers can offer and pay for COVID-19 testing as an occupational health and safety measure if an employer wishes to have its workforce get tested before returning to a work site. These employees should not seek a test at the City/County/State testing sites, which should be reserved for those who meet the medical or public health criteria for testing, and who do not have access to testing through their regular provider or health plan.
  3. Healthcare providers are required by a recent L.A. County Health Officer Order to provide their patients with access to COVID testing if they are symptomatic, are part of a public health investigation, or have been in close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 infected person. The Health Officer order also encourages providers to bill private insurance plans for these services whenever possible. Patients are not allowed to be charged by their plan or provider for COVID-19 tests. Obtaining testing through a patient’s regular provider network helps to assure tailored clinical advice and facilitates good follow-up in the case of positive results.
  4. A COVID-19 test does not protect you from the virus, and a negative result should not be seen as a reason to engage in risky social behavior. A COVID-19 test does not guarantee that you do not have the virus; a false- negative test is possible. Also, even when accurate, a test result only reflects whether you have the virus at the moment you took the test. You could become positive at any time and an exposure to COVID-19 could happen immediately following your test.
  5. Don’t panic. Although rising case numbers and hospitalizations are cause for concern, we can still turn this around by following the common-sense steps listed above. Los Angeles County came together to flatten the curve earlier in this pandemic, even when testing was much more limited than it is today, and we can do it again. We are still in a phased reopening, with many more options for safe recreation available, and it’s up to all of us to behave in ways that enable us to move forward, instead of taking a step back.
  6. More testing capacity is on the way. Appointments may be limited at testing sites due to increased demand. The County and the City of Los Angeles are adding capacity at existing sites, as well as standing up new County- and City-funded sites in high-need communities in the weeks to come. Learn more here

Remember: Regardless of test results, you still need to follow quarantine and isolation orders from Public Health or your provider. If you have been exposed to someone with COVID-19, you need to self-quarantine for 14 days, even if you test negative during that time. If you are experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, you should self- isolate in order to prevent spread of the virus to others and follow these steps:

  • Keep your physician informed of your symptoms and consult with your provider about getting tested. 
  • If you are elderly or have an underlying health condition, seek medical care. 
  • If you don’t have a physician, call 211 to get connected to one. 
  • If you are having trouble breathing or have other severe symptoms, dial 911 or go to the nearest hospital emergency department immediately. 
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